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What LEED Did for Buildings, Sustainable SITES Will Do for Landscapes -- and Not a Moment Too Soon

10.11.17
Source: Retrofit, 7/17/17

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Abstract:

At the forefront of this movement toward "greening" our landscapes is the Sustainable SITES Initiative (SITES), a program based on the understanding that land is a crucial component of the built environment and can be planned, designed, developed, and maintained to avoid, mitigate, and even reverse the detrimental impacts of urbanization and development.


Creative Distillers Tackle Food Waste, Redefining 'Getting Trashed'

10.4.17
Source: NPR, 10/3/17

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Abstract:

Distillers like Misadventure Vodka and Ventura Spirits are getting creative when it comes to reducing food waste.


Industrial Companies, Municipalities 'De-risk' Existing Water Supplies w/Wastewater Reuse Plans

9.14.17
Source: Environmental Leader, 9/13/17

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Abstract:

Climate volatility has led to an increasing focus on resiliency and water supply risk, both for companies and municipalities, and that focus is driving investment in water reuse/reclaimed wastewater solutions. While much of the focus has centered on municipal utilities, industrial companies are also expanding their role in water reuse adoption to supplement their ongoing water needs, according to a new report from Bluefield Research.


Unprecedented levels of nitrogen could pose risks to Earth's environment

9.7.17
Source: Phys.org, 9/6/17

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Abstract:

Human production of fixed nitrogen, used mostly to fertilize crops, now accounts for about half of the total fixed nitrogen added to the Earth both on land and in the oceans, according to a new study by researchers at North Carolina State University and Duke University.


Antidepressants found in fish brains in Great Lakes region

9.7.17
Source: Phys.org, 8/31/17

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Abstract:

Human antidepressants are building up in the brains of bass, walleye and several other fish common to the Great Lakes region, scientists say.


Many states have adopted policies to encourage energy efficiency

8.3.17
Source: Energy Information Administration, 8/3/17

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Abstract:

As of July 2017, thirty states and the District of Columbia have adopted energy efficiency policies--either mandated requirements, voluntary goals, or pilot programs--designed to lower the growth of electricity consumption by using electricity more efficiently. Seven of these states have either created new or updated existing energy efficiency standards within the past year.


Researchers working with sports venues to make them 'greener,' sustainable

7.10.17
Source: Penn State University, 7/6/17

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Abstract:

Ecosystem and bioproduct researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences are working with professional sports franchises to make their venues "greener" and reduce the environmental impact of their events.


Attempts to limit the use of hazardous substances in Europe are being hindered by poor implementation of Europe's chemical laws

7.7.17
Source: European Environmental Bureau, 6/22/17

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Abstract:

Governments who want to limit the use of toxic chemicals are being set a high burden of proof while industry concerns are being accepted with little evidence by the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA), analysis by the European Environmental Bureau (EEB) has found.


Are Fish Consumption Advisories for the Great Lakes Adequately Protective against Chemical Mixtures?

7.6.17
Source: Environmental Health Perspectives, April 2017

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Abstract:

Background: The North American Great Lakes are home to > 140 types of fish and are famous for recreational and commercial fishing. However, the presence of toxic substances has resulted in the issuance of fish consumption advisories that are typically based on the most restrictive contaminant.

Objectives: We investigated whether these advisories, which typically neglect the existence of a mixture of chemicals and their possible additive adverse effects, are adequately protective of the health of humans consuming fish from the Canadian waters of the Great Lakes.

Methods: Using recent fish contaminant monitoring data collected by the government of Ontario, Canada, we simulated advisories using most-restrictive-contaminant (one-chem) and multi-contaminant additive effect (multi-chem) approaches. The advisories from the two simulations were compared to determine if there is any deficiency in the currently issued advisories.

Results: Approximately half of the advisories currently issued are potentially not adequately protective. Of the four Great Lakes studied, the highest percentage of advisories affected are in Lake Ontario if an additive effect is considered. Many fish that are popular for consumption, such as walleye, salmon, bass and trout, would have noticeably more stringent advisories.

Conclusions: Improvements in the advisories may be needed to ensure that the health of humans consuming fish from the Great Lakes is protected. In this region, total polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and mercury are the major contaminants causing restrictions on consuming fish, whereas dioxins/furans, toxaphene, and mirex/photomirex are of minor concern. Regular monitoring of most organochlorine pesticides and metals in fish can be discontinued.


Study: Measures of food waste are 'overstated' and potentially consequential

6.23.17
Source: Food Dive, 6/21/17

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Abstract:

A new study published on behalf of the Agricultural & Applied Economics Association claims measures of food waste are "inconsistent" and may be overstated.


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