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Food waste still a priority in latest Farm Bill

7.16.18
Source: WasteDive, 7/11/18

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Abstract:

The Senate's latest Farm Bill draft -- passed as the Agricultural Improvement Act of 2018 on June 28 -- still contains multiple relevant items on food waste, according to analysis by the Harvard Food Law & Policy Clinic. This includes $25 million in annual funding for composting and food waste reduction pilots with municipal governments in at least 10 states -- with a 25% matching requirement. A new amendment would also create an Interagency Biogas Task Force to study a broad range of barriers and opportunities in the sector, including landfills and anaerobic digesters. Other notable items for the industry include a USDA study on the volume and cost of food waste, with the provision that agency programs "do not disrupt existing food waste recovery and disposal by commercial, marketing, or business relationships." Multiple other items regarding spoilage prevention, food recovery and donation liability protections are also included.


3 key areas to watch in the national organics conversation

7.3.18
Source: WasteDive, 6/28/18

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Abstract:

The food waste movement is alive and well, experiencing rapid growth and continually attracting awareness, according to discussions at this week's 2018 U.S. Food Waste Summit. Among the many takeaways and pieces of news during the two-day summit, packaging, infrastructure, and policy are three areas that bear watching for the waste and recycling industry.


Let it rain! New coatings make natural fabrics waterproof

7.2.18
Source: Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 6/29/18

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Abstract:

Fabrics that resist water are essential for everything from rainwear to military tents, but conventional water-repellent coatings have been shown to persist in the environment and accumulate in our bodies, and so are likely to be phased out for safety reasons. That leaves a big gap to be filled if researchers can find safe substitutes. Now, a team at MIT has come up with a promising solution: a coating that not only adds water-repellency to natural fabrics such as cotton and silk, but is also more effective than the existing coatings. The new findings are described in the journal Advanced Functional Materials, in a paper by MIT professors Kripa Varanasi and Karen Gleason, former MIT postdoc Dan Soto, and two others.


Oil and Gas Wastewater Use in Road Maintenance is a Potential Pollution Source

6.29.18
Source: GLRPPR Blog,

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Abstract:

Did you know that at least 13 states, including IL, IN, MI, NY, OH, & PA, allow wastewater from oil and gas extraction to be used in a variety of road maintenance applications?


5 ways hospitals can launch effective recycling programs for single-use products

6.28.18
Source: GreenBiz, 6/25/18

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Abstract:

Dignity Health's sustainability leader on how the health care giant put circular economy ideals into practice.


Where the US stands on federal food waste policy

6.27.18
Source: WasteDive, 6/27/18

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Abstract:

While it may have been overshadowed by recycling commodity issues, and other big shifts in federal environmental policy, food waste is still on the agenda in Washington, D.C. and gaining momentum. That has been one of the key messages so far at this year's U.S. Food Waste Summit -- hosted by the Harvard Food Law & Policy Clinic (HFLPC) and ReFED in Cambridge, Massachusetts -- among participants from business, government, philanthropic organizations and other sectors.


Redesign your clothes at the newly redesigned H&M Paris flagship

6.25.18
Source: Fashion Week Daily, 6/20/18

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Abstract:

When H&M opens the doors to its newly renovated Parisian flagship tomorrow, customers will feel like they've entered some sort of fast-fashion atelier. The top floor of the Swedish retailer's massive new store, 50,000-square-feet sprawling out over six floors, will be home to a fleet of sewing machines, bottles of natural detergents and eco-friendly stain removing sprays, along with bins of patches and embroideries. It's the store's new repair station, a result of the company's new "Take Care" sustainability initiative. The idea is to invite customers to bring in clothing, not just H&M clothing, to be repaired and made new again.


NFL Joins Green Sports Alliance, Formally Commits to Sustainability

6.25.18
Source: Environmental Leader, 6/19/18

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Abstract:

The NFL has joined the Green Sports Alliance as a league member in an effort to support sustainability efforts across the NFL as a whole. Several NFL teams and venues have been members of the alliance for years. Now, the league is formally pledging its commitment to environmental stewardship and engagement, and could save substantial sums of money in the process, the Green Sports Alliance says.


Electric vehicle networks need to be open, smart, clean and equitable

6.25.18
Source: GreenBiz, 6/19/18

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Abstract:

A group of major automakers, utilities, tech companies, environmental firms and industry groups have come together to outline best practices to help build electric vehicle charging networks that are open, smart, clean and equitable.


World's strongest biomaterial now comes from a tree?

6.25.18
Source: Chemical & Engineering News, 6/19/18

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Abstract:

Spider silk has long been considered the strongest biological material in the world and has inspired generations of materials scientists to understand and mimic its properties. However, new findings knock spider silk off its pedestal, reporting that engineered cellulose fibers, derived from plant cell walls, are the strongest biobased material. The material is more than 20% stronger than and eight times as stiff as spider silk. It could eventually be used in lightweight biobased composites for cars, bikes, and medical devices, the researchers say.


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