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Minnesota Out Front on Addressing Nitrogen Problems

1.19.18
Source: Minnesota Public Radio, 12/28/17

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Abstract:

Minnesota is the first state in the nation to try telling farmers how to apply fertilizer to their crops.


4 Steps to Building a Business Case for Efficiency (Hint: Avoid the 'Poor Performer' Tag)

1.10.18
Source: Environmental Leader, 1/8/18

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Abstract:

Many large organizations have lofty efficiency goals, but struggle to turn them into reality -- often because there's limited buy-in where it truly matters. One of the most critical, often-overlooked steps to launching successful efficiency- and environmental-management programs is creating an effective business case that not only promotes projects internally, but helps to ensure success during the implementation phase and beyond. Far too many plans either don't get approved, or are approved and then stall, earning the "poor performer" tag and positioning resource efficiency poorly on any future priority lists. So how can energy managers turn their efficiency dreams into a company-backed reality? They should start by following these four steps as they build a business case to fund critical efficiency programs.


Want to Lower Health Care Costs? Stop Wasting Our Money

1.9.18
Source: ProPublica, 12/21/17

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Abstract:

This year ProPublica documented the many ways waste is baked into our health care system, from destroying perfectly good medication to junking brand new supplies. Eliminating the waste could insure millions of Americans.


Aquapod water treatment studied for water conservation at power plants

1.8.18
Source: Illinois Sustainable Technology Center, 12/7/17

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Abstract:

A low-energy water treatment system developed at the Illinois Sustainable Technology Center (ISTC) has been selected for development by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as an improved technology for water conservation in power plants.


Will China's crackdown on 'foreign garbage' force wealthy countries to recycle more of their own waste?

12.13.17
Source: The Conversation, 12/13/17

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Abstract:

With holidays approaching, many of us are mindful of the need to collect and recycle all the additional plastic, paper and other waste that we are about to generate. This year, however, there are questions about where that waste will end up. China, the world's largest importer of scrap, is looking to clean up its act.


When and how to use the term 'zero waste' -- and when to avoid it

12.12.17
Source: Waste Dive, 12/11/17

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Abstract:

Do we need the term "zero waste" to guide our consumption and waste behaviors, or are we better off without it?


Will people eat relish made from 'waste' ingredients? Study finds they may even prefer it

12.12.17
Source: Drexel University, 12/12/17

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Abstract:

A new Drexel University study found strong potential for consumer acceptance of a new category of foods created from discarded ingredients.


A First Among States, California Plugs the 'Carbon Loophole'

11.30.17
Source: Governing, 11/30/17

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Abstract:

The new Buy Clean California Act is the world's first legislative effort to address supply chain carbon emissions.


Soon we won't be able to ship our recycling to China -- and that's a problem

11.27.17
Source: Mother Nature Network, 11/27/17

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Abstract:

In July, China's Ministry of Environmental Protection told the World Trade Organization that it would no longer accept imports of 24 common types of once-permitted solid waste due to contamination concerns. The ban extends to various recyclables including several plastics such as PET and PVC, certain textiles and mixed waste paper. Easier-to-recycle metals are not included in the new restrictions.


Meeting Materials Available for EPA's December 6th Public Meeting on New Chemicals

11.13.17
Source: U.S. EPA, 11/13/17

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Abstract:

EPA is making available the agenda and other meeting materials for its planned December 6, 2017 public meeting to discuss ongoing implementation activities in the New Chemicals Review Program of the Frank R. Lautenberg Chemical Safety for the 21st Century Act, which amended the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

The December 6th meeting is to update and engage with the public on the Agency's progress in implementing changes to the New Chemicals Review Program as a result of the 2016 amendments to TSCA, including discussion of EPA's New Chemicals Decision-Making Framework. EPA will describe its review process for new chemicals under the amended statute, and interested parties will have the opportunity to provide input on their experiences with the New Chemicals Review Program since the statute was amended and to ask questions. In addition, EPA will accept questions from the public in advance of the meeting, and will respond to these questions at the meeting as time allows.

To view the meeting materials, register to attend, submit questions, and learn more, visit the link below.


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